Round Table Discussion 2: What Documents Constrain, Narrate, or Liberate Subjecthood?

Documented processes that are prescribed and enforced by official and state methods can limit, if not erase, who we are, and, in doing so, they lend insight into how we render persons as subjects and as legible. A broader concept of documentary membership complicates the notion that status is essentially vested in documents, rather than in the activities and lived experiences of persons. Membership and rights need not be predicated on access or possession of state documents, but can materialize in numerous more meaningful ways, in more grounded and active engagement in political and social activities.

Participants are Dr. Nicole Fleetwood (Rutgers University), Dr. Dan Berger (UW Bothell), Alex Fisher (UW Seattle, Pre-Doctoral Student), Dan Paz (UW Seattle), and Dr. Carolyn Pinedo-Turnovsky (UW Seattle).

Round Table Discussion 3: What is the human, anyway?

The “human” is a historically constructed category with political and social agency, and in Western science and culture sets up a hierarchical distinction from other animals and forms of life. In this process of differentiation, animality has been racialized, and used as a means of limiting freedom and protections to members of humankind that threaten a fantasy of white superiority. How do these hierarchies and distinctions persist in the shaping of policy and social relations? How might thinking across species reveal new opportunities for liberation work across different forms of oppression wrought by racism, sexism, imperialism, and capitalism? And, thinking beyond the animal, how might we turn to other forms of interspecies connections and multi-species agencies to recalibrate the meaning of the human for survival on our damaged planet?

Participants are Dr. Colin Dayan (Vanderbilt University), Dr. María Elena García (UW Seattle), Dr. Radhika Govindrajan (UW Seattle), Dr. Phillip Thurtle (UW. Seattle), and Dr. Joanne Woiak (UW Seattle).

Maria Gaspar: Disappearance Landscape

Disappearance Landscape is a virtual workshop that uses the body to interrogate and intervene highly contested sites. Using green screen strategies, participants will examine jails, prisons, border walls, conflict zones, and other places of power in order to mediate, flip, dissect, transpose, or dismantle forms of oppression and confinement.
Registration information forthcoming. If you are a University of Washington graduate student who would like to reserve a spot in the workshop, please email contact-programs@henryart.org. A recording of the workshop will be shared here on the colloquium website.

Bambitchell: Performance-Lecture

Bambitchell will give a performance-lecture, which will narrate untold stories from their research on Medieval animal trials. The performance will include audio-visual components in combination with live narration to explore themes such as legal personhood, property, and land rights.

Registration information forthcoming. If you are a University of Washington graduate student who would like to reserve a spot in this program, please email contact-programs@henryart.org. A recording of the program will be shared here on the colloquium website.

Bambitchell: Bugs & Beasts Colloquium | © 2020 Henry Art Gallery