Widely maintained mythologies hold that “justice” refers to conclusive punishment for criminal wrongdoing (as in “an eye for an eye”). These narratives, centered on deviant acts rather than the systems in which actions unfold, delimit the possibility of justice within longstanding and embedded structures that have excluded certain individuals from the onset. If justice is understood as a process rather than an outcome, part of its work is to scrutinize the systems within which exclusive and excluding laws have been written and sustained.
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Black and white photo of Sarah Keenan
Sarah Keenan
School of Law, Birkbeck, University of London
Black and white photo of Bambitchell
Photo by Yuula Benivolski
Bambitchell
Black and white photo of Rutger Ceballos
Rutger Ceballos
Graduate Student, Political Science
Black and white photo of Chandan Reddy
Chandan Reddy
Associate Professor, Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies
Black and white photo of Grace Reinke
Grace Reinke
Graduate Student, Political Science
Black and white photo of Christopher J. Schell
Christopher J. Schell
Assistant Professor, School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences

View a recording of the online roundtable that took place on October 22, 2020, with Sarah Keenan, Chandan Reddy, and Christopher Schell.